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Missionary Retreat Fellowship

Some time back in the '60's, a missionary family told a sympathetic couple that coming on furlough was so difficult because they had no place to live.  Coming back to the USA entailed renting a house for a year and begging, borrowing, or buying furniture and furnishings, all of which then had to be gotten rid of when the year was up.  Through this conversation, God gave them the vision of a place where missionaries could live with a minimal amount of set-up hassle.  They could move in with their suitcase of clothes, settle in to a comfortable home, be renewed and refreshed, and then move out at the end of their furlough (or home assignment as we now call it), head back to the field, and another missionary would move into their house.  A local farmer donated several hundred acres of wooded land on a hillside in the Poconos and Missionary Retreat Fellowship was born.

Today MRF has seven homes available for missionaries to use while on home assignment.  Each one is tastefully decorated with furniture, linens, and kitchen equipment.  Nestled in the woods, it is a true place of rest.

We spent an awful lot of time on the road this home assignment, but when we were "home", this is where we were.  We are so thankful to Bob and Bess Butters for having the vision of MRF, to Forrest Compton for donating the land and continuing to be involved in upkeep, to Don and Gail Schuit who manage the grounds, and to Brian and Lisa Biegert who do maintenance, housekeeping, and fund-raising, and most of all to God for creating such a beautiful spot on the earth and for working through His people.  It's a great place to stay and I'll let the pictures speak for themselves!









Comments

Beth said…
It looks so relaxing there!
Christie said…
Wow, that's beautiful! Your cousin Christine, who is one of my dearest friends, passed this blog post on to me. :) My husband and I are missionaries in Nigeria, and we always struggle with where to stay when we return. I was just telling Christine that I have a hope to one day do a similar thing when we return to the U.S. I would love to be able to help in easing some of the stress of coming back to the States and provide such a service to missionaries. What a cool ministry the Missionary Retreat Fellowship has! Thanks for sharing about it. :)

-Christie

p.s. Love that creek! Gorgeous!
junk car towing said…
I truly love your website.. Pleasant colors & theme.

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sumatisons said…
BUTTYFUL POSTERS AND NICE PLACES.

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